Wide open spaces, endless views make Nebraska a top skydiving state

CRETE - Nebraska is home to one of the biggest thrill seeking activities known to man: skydiving.

Crete Municipal Airport is home to Skydive Atlas, the states only professional skydiving business. Some say Nebraska's wide open spaces and endless views make it one of the top places in the country to take the plunge. 

Skydive Atlas opened in 2003, but many Nebraskans still don’t know it exists. Sean Tillery is the owner of Skydive Atlas.

"We take you up to about 12,000 feet, the door opens, and that's when it gets real," Tillery said. "You jump out, there's about 45 seconds of free fall and about six minutes of free fall, flying the parachute, we actually let you fly the parachute for a bit."

Miriam Perez and Michael James just moved to Omaha. One of the first things they did as Nebraskans, was go skydiving.

"It was insane," James said. "When you jump out you're just fully immersed in it, you look down, it was just crazy!"

With its wide open spaces, far out horizons, and endless fields, many say Nebraska is among the top states to skydive. While Tillery has jumped out of planes around the country, he still vouches for his home state.

With its wide open spaces, far out horizons, and endless fields, many say Nebraska is among the top states to skydive. While Tillery has jumped out of planes around the country, he still couches for his home state.

"It's a beautiful sight from 12,000 feet. Lots of circles and squares, tons of farmland," Tillery said. "Jumping in Hawaii was pretty cool, I've also jumped in upstate New York, but I'm from Nebraska, so I have a ton of love for my home state."

Miriam and Michael just moved to Omaha from Colorado. Even with the amazing views the Rocky Mountains may provide, add them to the list of those who believe the Cornhusker state is the one of the best for skydiving. 

"100%! You could see so much of the landscape it was amazing," Perez said. 

"On the way down you could see the big corn fields moving in the wind which was incredible," James said. 

While the stereotype may be Nebraska is just "cornfields and cows" it looks pretty different from 13,500 feet above. 

 

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